Monthly Archives

May 2021

How a pain point in Egypt spurred the timber industry towards efficiency and cooperationAmir Rashad

By Logistics, MarketNo Comments

A dramatic increase in the prevalence of supply chain pain points has presented an opportunity for innovation and collaboration, whilst underscoring the importance of digital solutions in the timber logistics sector.

Timber companies used the term “pain point” to refer to an inefficient port or a particularly cumbersome customs authority.

These pain points stood out because they were isolated pockets of inefficiency, delaying an otherwise well-functioning network that carried everything from raw materials to finished goods from one corner of the world to the other.

Over the last year, that has all changed. Pain points became endemic.

The networks that we all depend on have been pushed close to the breaking point, with pain points proliferating and volatility increasing.

While many timber industry stakeholders are rightfully unhappy about these conditions, there is a silver lining.

Efforts to streamline pain points have forced the industry to move beyond the “tried-and-true,” and adopt technology solutions that will continue to deliver cost savings long after the pandemic is in our rear-view mirror.

To illustrate this trend, let us unpack a solution implemented by Centersource Technologies in partnership with CargoX, which we believe is the sort of solution that this moment calls for.

We have increased cooperation and eliminated redundancies using blockchain technology to create an efficient, secure means of navigating a geographic and bureaucratic pain point – importing timber, in this case, into Egypt.

Egypt established NAFEZA, a portal to connect customs and governmental authorities in Egypt with trade parties: importers, exporters, shipping lines & brokers.

To this end, an Advance Cargo Information (ACI) system was created to achieve Egypt’s goals of conducting early assessments of goods imported before shipments arrived at Egyptian ports, and to expedite the customs clearance procedures.

Centersource - Timber pain point

While Egypt’s new system is ostensibly about speeding up customs procedures and improving border security, we have used this opportunity to partner with CargoX, allowing exporters to upload documents from our platform using blockchain technology that ensures transparency and accountability between people and organizations.

We are integrating with Egypt’s customs authority, via CargoX, to make the process truly seamless across documents issued by chambers of commerce, vessel shipment tracking and schedules, and much more, in a streamlined format where the importer can collaborate in Arabic and has clear warnings and milestones of the process

This automated transmission of documents creates a seamless integration of the timber supply chain with a national customs body.

We’ve transformed what used to be siloed processes and created a space where customers can engage in the transactional side of the business (tender ocean freight, negotiate offers, draft documents, and much more) and at the same time navigate the bureaucracy of international trade.

This latest addition to the suite of tools that we offer our customers is part of a growing toolbox created to mitigate supply chain risks for the forestry industry. It builds on a holistic effort to establish accountability, efficiency, transparency, and integration as industry norms.

At Timber Exchange, we believe that the challenges we face require a combination of cooperation and technology. This means automating actionable notifications, automating manual tasks, making information available to companies in their languages, and integrating players across the supply chain.

In pursuit of this, we have incorporated more than 80 smart tools to increase supply chain efficiency, and save time and money via automated processes and information flows.

Our platform lets users track their shipments and couriers, send tasks to colleagues and trade partners, and track responsibilities and milestones in the deal process.

Centersource sends alerts in the event of any deviations. Users can upload, edit and approve documents. This means that they can both add existing contracts and explore new business opportunities in an open marketplace. This consolidation and automation is key to eliminating pain points.

New pain points will emerge in the months and years ahead, because this is the new normal. We’re in new territory.

But as agents of cooperation and results, our technology and communications-driven approach make us ready for the challenge.

We’re building a supply chain collaboration platform, working with our partners, customers, and stakeholders to ensure that everything that happens, from the first business inquiry by an exporter until the goods arrive at destination, is free of pain points.

The post How a pain point in Egypt spurred the timber industry towards efficiency and cooperation appeared first on Shipping and Freight Resource.

A dramatic increase in the prevalence of supply chain pain points has presented an opportunity for innovation and collaboration, whilst underscoring the importance of digital solutions in the timber logistics sector.
Timber companies used the term “pain point” to refer to an inefficient port or a particularly cumbersome customs authority.
These pain points stood out because they were isolated pockets of inefficiency, delaying an otherwise well-functioning network that carried everything from raw materials to finished goods from one corner of the world to the other.
Over the last year, that has all changed. Pain points became endemic.
Go to full article >>>
The post How a pain point in Egypt spurred the timber industry towards efficiency and cooperation appeared first on Shipping and Freight Resource.Read MoreShipping and Freight Resource

How a pain point in Egypt spurred the timber industry towards efficiency and cooperationAmir Rashad

By MarketNo Comments

A dramatic increase in the prevalence of supply chain pain points has presented an opportunity for innovation and collaboration, whilst underscoring the importance of digital solutions in the timber logistics sector.

Timber companies used the term “pain point” to refer to an inefficient port or a particularly cumbersome customs authority.

These pain points stood out because they were isolated pockets of inefficiency, delaying an otherwise well-functioning network that carried everything from raw materials to finished goods from one corner of the world to the other.

Over the last year, that has all changed. Pain points became endemic.

The networks that we all depend on have been pushed close to the breaking point, with pain points proliferating and volatility increasing.

While many timber industry stakeholders are rightfully unhappy about these conditions, there is a silver lining.

Efforts to streamline pain points have forced the industry to move beyond the “tried-and-true,” and adopt technology solutions that will continue to deliver cost savings long after the pandemic is in our rear-view mirror.

To illustrate this trend, let us unpack a solution implemented by Centersource Technologies in partnership with CargoX, which we believe is the sort of solution that this moment calls for.

We have increased cooperation and eliminated redundancies using blockchain technology to create an efficient, secure means of navigating a geographic and bureaucratic pain point – importing timber, in this case, into Egypt.

Egypt established NAFEZA, a portal to connect customs and governmental authorities in Egypt with trade parties: importers, exporters, shipping lines & brokers.

To this end, an Advance Cargo Information (ACI) system was created to achieve Egypt’s goals of conducting early assessments of goods imported before shipments arrived at Egyptian ports, and to expedite the customs clearance procedures.

Centersource - Timber pain point

While Egypt’s new system is ostensibly about speeding up customs procedures and improving border security, we have used this opportunity to partner with CargoX, allowing exporters to upload documents from our platform using blockchain technology that ensures transparency and accountability between people and organizations.

We are integrating with Egypt’s customs authority, via CargoX, to make the process truly seamless across documents issued by chambers of commerce, vessel shipment tracking and schedules, and much more, in a streamlined format where the importer can collaborate in Arabic and has clear warnings and milestones of the process

This automated transmission of documents creates a seamless integration of the timber supply chain with a national customs body.

We’ve transformed what used to be siloed processes and created a space where customers can engage in the transactional side of the business (tender ocean freight, negotiate offers, draft documents, and much more) and at the same time navigate the bureaucracy of international trade.

This latest addition to the suite of tools that we offer our customers is part of a growing toolbox created to mitigate supply chain risks for the forestry industry. It builds on a holistic effort to establish accountability, efficiency, transparency, and integration as industry norms.

At Timber Exchange, we believe that the challenges we face require a combination of cooperation and technology. This means automating actionable notifications, automating manual tasks, making information available to companies in their languages, and integrating players across the supply chain.

In pursuit of this, we have incorporated more than 80 smart tools to increase supply chain efficiency, and save time and money via automated processes and information flows.

Our platform lets users track their shipments and couriers, send tasks to colleagues and trade partners, and track responsibilities and milestones in the deal process.

Centersource sends alerts in the event of any deviations. Users can upload, edit and approve documents. This means that they can both add existing contracts and explore new business opportunities in an open marketplace. This consolidation and automation is key to eliminating pain points.

New pain points will emerge in the months and years ahead, because this is the new normal. We’re in new territory.

But as agents of cooperation and results, our technology and communications-driven approach make us ready for the challenge.

We’re building a supply chain collaboration platform, working with our partners, customers, and stakeholders to ensure that everything that happens, from the first business inquiry by an exporter until the goods arrive at destination, is free of pain points.

The post How a pain point in Egypt spurred the timber industry towards efficiency and cooperation appeared first on Shipping and Freight Resource.

A dramatic increase in the prevalence of supply chain pain points has presented an opportunity for innovation and collaboration, whilst underscoring the importance of digital solutions in the timber logistics sector.
Timber companies used the term “pain point” to refer to an inefficient port or a particularly cumbersome customs authority.
These pain points stood out because they were isolated pockets of inefficiency, delaying an otherwise well-functioning network that carried everything from raw materials to finished goods from one corner of the world to the other.
Over the last year, that has all changed. Pain points became endemic.
Go to full article >>>
The post How a pain point in Egypt spurred the timber industry towards efficiency and cooperation appeared first on Shipping and Freight Resource.Read More

X-Press Pearl – fiery saga continues amid concerns of serious impact on the environmentNews Desk

By Logistics, MarketNo Comments

X-Press Pearl – Update : 29.05.2021

It is rarely that a 2-3 month old ship faces a possible fiery end of its life. The world hopes that will not be the case with the X-Press Pearl – a Singapore flagged 36150 DWT container ship which is still burning in Sri Lankan waters, off the port of Colombo since the 21st of May.

As per the operators of the vessel X-Press Feeders, firefighting operations to extinguish the blaze aboard the vessel have successfully reduced the area affected by flames and contained it to the aft of the ship, despite the adverse weather conditions.

Firefighting tugs continue spraying and misting the vessel with support from the Sri Lankan Navy and Indian coastguard, who remain on scene to assist in the operation.

X-Press Feeders are further reporting that as of 09:45 the 29th of May 2021, the salvors of the vessel – Smit Salvage – have confirmed that the vessel’s hull and bunker tanks remains structurally intact and that there has been no loss of oil into the port’s waters. This has been also confirmed by the Sri Lankan Navy.

However, there is serious concern that there will be severe environmental impact due to the incident in which several containers have already fallen off the ship and have washed up ashore, especially near Negombo a popular tourist destination in Sri Lanka.

Click to view slideshow.

Images of contractors and people cleaning up debris, especially tonnes of plastic waste, are making the rounds in the media. Clean up and safe disposal efforts are being made by the authorities.

While the cleaning operations continue for the third day, fishermen have been banned from an 80-kilometre (50-mile) stretch of coast near the ship as authorities are worried about the millions of polyethylene pellets washing up on beaches and threatening fish-breeding shallow waters which is known for its crabs and jumbo prawns as well as its tourist beaches.

This is probably the worst beach pollution in our history,” said Dharshani Lahandapura, head of Sri Lanka’s Marine Environment and Protection Authority (MEPA).

Ms Lahandapura advised the media that “Our best option is to clean the beach and we suspect any clearing operation will take a few weeks, if not months.” She added that they “will test the air and water quality amid concerns that the fumes from the blazing ship might have contaminated the air and water sources and could have harmful effects on the residents“.

The impact on mangroves, lagoons and marine wildlife in the region is still to be assessed but the MEPA is advising that thousands of fishermen are at risk of losing their livelihood in the immediate to near future.

The ship was carrying among other goods, cargoes of sodium hydroxide, lubricants and other chemicals much of which is said to have been destroyed in the fire as per MEPA officials.

Visuals released by local media has shown that various beaches extending from Colombo to Negombo on the country’s West Coast, had been polluted from debris from the burning ship and authorities have warned people not to touch it as it may be harmful

Dharshani Lahandapura is reported to have told AFP news agency that “the crew had known of a nitric acid leak aboard the vessel even before it entered Sri Lankan waters, and the fire could have been avoided if they acted promptly” even as experts are considering the option of towing the ship to deeper waters in the Indian Ocean, presumably to address the possibility of the ship sinking.

It is also understood that officials have lodged a police complaint against the captain of the X-Press Pearl, who was rescued along with other crew members, in line with several other incidents where Captains of ships have been held Captains of ships have been held personally responsible for maritime disasters involving their ships.

The post X-Press Pearl – fiery saga continues amid concerns of serious impact on the environment appeared first on Shipping and Freight Resource.

It is rarely that a 2-3 month old ship faces a possible fiery end of its life.
The world hopes that will not be the case with the X-Press Pearl – a Singapore flagged 36150 DWT container ship which is still burning in Sri Lankan waters, off the port of Colombo since the 21st of May.
This is amid serious concerns of severe environmental impact due to the incident in which several containers have already fallen off the ship and have washed up ashore, especially near Negombo a popular tourist destination in Sri Lanka.
Go to full article >>>
The post X-Press Pearl – fiery saga continues amid concerns of serious impact on the environment appeared first on Shipping and Freight Resource.Read MoreShipping and Freight Resource

X-Press Pearl – fiery saga continues amid concerns of serious impact on the environmentNews Desk

By MarketNo Comments

X-Press Pearl – Update : 29.05.2021

It is rarely that a 2-3 month old ship faces a possible fiery end of its life. The world hopes that will not be the case with the X-Press Pearl – a Singapore flagged 36150 DWT container ship which is still burning in Sri Lankan waters, off the port of Colombo since the 21st of May.

As per the operators of the vessel X-Press Feeders, firefighting operations to extinguish the blaze aboard the vessel have successfully reduced the area affected by flames and contained it to the aft of the ship, despite the adverse weather conditions.

Firefighting tugs continue spraying and misting the vessel with support from the Sri Lankan Navy and Indian coastguard, who remain on scene to assist in the operation.

X-Press Feeders are further reporting that as of 09:45 the 29th of May 2021, the salvors of the vessel – Smit Salvage – have confirmed that the vessel’s hull and bunker tanks remains structurally intact and that there has been no loss of oil into the port’s waters. This has been also confirmed by the Sri Lankan Navy.

However, there is serious concern that there will be severe environmental impact due to the incident in which several containers have already fallen off the ship and have washed up ashore, especially near Negombo a popular tourist destination in Sri Lanka.

Click to view slideshow.

Images of contractors and people cleaning up debris, especially tonnes of plastic waste, are making the rounds in the media. Clean up and safe disposal efforts are being made by the authorities.

While the cleaning operations continue for the third day, fishermen have been banned from an 80-kilometre (50-mile) stretch of coast near the ship as authorities are worried about the millions of polyethylene pellets washing up on beaches and threatening fish-breeding shallow waters which is known for its crabs and jumbo prawns as well as its tourist beaches.

This is probably the worst beach pollution in our history,” said Dharshani Lahandapura, head of Sri Lanka’s Marine Environment and Protection Authority (MEPA).

Ms Lahandapura advised the media that “Our best option is to clean the beach and we suspect any clearing operation will take a few weeks, if not months.” She added that they “will test the air and water quality amid concerns that the fumes from the blazing ship might have contaminated the air and water sources and could have harmful effects on the residents“.

The impact on mangroves, lagoons and marine wildlife in the region is still to be assessed but the MEPA is advising that thousands of fishermen are at risk of losing their livelihood in the immediate to near future.

The ship was carrying among other goods, cargoes of sodium hydroxide, lubricants and other chemicals much of which is said to have been destroyed in the fire as per MEPA officials.

Visuals released by local media has shown that various beaches extending from Colombo to Negombo on the country’s West Coast, had been polluted from debris from the burning ship and authorities have warned people not to touch it as it may be harmful

Dharshani Lahandapura is reported to have told AFP news agency that “the crew had known of a nitric acid leak aboard the vessel even before it entered Sri Lankan waters, and the fire could have been avoided if they acted promptly” even as experts are considering the option of towing the ship to deeper waters in the Indian Ocean, presumably to address the possibility of the ship sinking.

It is also understood that officials have lodged a police complaint against the captain of the X-Press Pearl, who was rescued along with other crew members, in line with several other incidents where Captains of ships have been held Captains of ships have been held personally responsible for maritime disasters involving their ships.

The post X-Press Pearl – fiery saga continues amid concerns of serious impact on the environment appeared first on Shipping and Freight Resource.

It is rarely that a 2-3 month old ship faces a possible fiery end of its life.
The world hopes that will not be the case with the X-Press Pearl – a Singapore flagged 36150 DWT container ship which is still burning in Sri Lankan waters, off the port of Colombo since the 21st of May.
This is amid serious concerns of severe environmental impact due to the incident in which several containers have already fallen off the ship and have washed up ashore, especially near Negombo a popular tourist destination in Sri Lanka.
Go to full article >>>
The post X-Press Pearl – fiery saga continues amid concerns of serious impact on the environment appeared first on Shipping and Freight Resource.Read More

The ability to share data could prove key to deterring and defeating adversaries

By Defense, MarketNo Comments

Data is the lifeblood of today’s global economies and of national security. Recognizing how data reliance has contributed to changes in warfare, victory belongs to the side that can process and…Data is the lifeblood of today’s global economies and of national security. Recognizing how data reliance has contributed to changes in warfare, victory belongs to the side that can process and…Defense News

First-Class Stamp Will Cost 58¢ in USPS Rate Increase PlanTodd Shields

By Logistics, MarketNo Comments

The U.S. Postal Service plans to boost the price of a first class stamp to 58 cents from 55 cents as it works to stabilize finances amid slumping mail volume and lagging delivery.The U.S. Postal Service plans to boost the price of a first class stamp to 58 cents from 55 cents as it works to stabilize finances amid slumping mail volume and lagging delivery.Read MoreTransport Topics